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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,832 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama cuts short his vacation to head back to washington, while harry reid says the country is headed toward the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on efforts to avert the looming deadline from todd zwillich of public radio international. >> brown: then, geo-politics and children: russia moves to end adoptions by american parents. >> warner: what austerity measures look like at street level: we have a report from athens. >> by the end of 2013 greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. b
jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: after talks between president obama and congressional republicans stall, the house moves toward a vote on speaker boehner's plan-b for limited tax increases. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we sort through the state of play and the latest political maneuvering with congress watcher norman ornstein and political editor christina bellantoni. >> brown: then we look at the suspension of the u.n.'s polio eradication campaign in pakistan, after the killings of nine aid workers. >> suarez: from capitol hill, kwame holman reports on two congressional hearings today where state department officials accepted blame in failing to protect the u.s. diplomatic mission in libya. >> we have to do better. we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. we owe it to the security professionals who acted with such extraordinary heroism that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day
with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like y
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: christmas eve shootings killed two firefighters in rochester, new york and a policeman and bystander in houston, texas. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the killings, coming ten days after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. >> brown: then, we turn to egypt, and accusations of voting fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate
here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again to
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: with no compromise in sight for a deficit deal, president obama pressed his case at the home of a middle class family in virginia today, part of his pitch to extend tax cuts for all but the very wealthy. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the state of the negotiations and examine the push to make changes to social security and medicare. >> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close r directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high s
>> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology,
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a so
. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we look at this first cabinet change for the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's
at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the number of new jobs came in better than expected today and the rate of unemployment was the lowest s
>> and it is my honor to introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recent transplant to california. i would like to let the governor know that i am happy to be here. it is a good space. recently, governor brown has spent a lot of time, focus, and effort making california a better place. focus on eliminating waste, increasing efficiency, decreasing the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for
in the newscast as needed. >>> news from the state capitol where governor jerry brown reveals he has prostate cancer. his doctor says he has an excellent prognosis for recovery. leslie brinkley with more on the course of treatment. >> that's right. governor brown has already started treatment that is expected to wrap up the week of january 7th. and he intends to keep up a full work schedule. governor brown is undergoing radio therapy for prostate cancer with his office describing the condition as a localizedr. prostate cancer. >> it sounds like he has early stage disease that is likely confined to the prostate. meaning it was picked up before it has had a chance to spread any place else. >> great swift works at the medical center and interpreted the statement released by brown's oncologist at ucsf as meaning the governor will undergo conventional exter national radiation therapy called image guided imrt. that likely means five days a week he will have to report to a radiation treatment facility. there are several in sacramento. he would then lie on the table and receive two to three minutes o
earned a more formidable reputation as an analytical thinker than harold brown who was the nation's 14th defense secretary during the carter administration. a true prodigy he earned hi doctorate in physics from columbia university when he was just 21. he started his career at livermore lab in california and eventually moving to the pentagon where he became the director of defense research and engineering then air force secretary and eventually defense secretary. his ability to handle a staggering workload are legend including read and annotating 400 page briefing books overnight. during the career brown shaped fighters like the f-15 and f-16 that remain the air force's backbone fleet today. and championed jointness among the military serv before the failed iran hostage rescue mission convinced others to follow. now 85, brown continues to serve on the defense policy board and is a trustee of the center for strategic and international studies. with joyce winds low, brown recently co-authored "star- spangled security" applying lessons safeguarding america. i asked him whether jointness was
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get perspective on the partisan tug- of-war in washington, from one half of the team that produced the deficit-cutting plan republicans say is their inspiration, democrat erskine bowles. >> there are over $7 trillion worth of economic events that are going to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of t
. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>
. with that poll, showing 48% would say today that they would vote for scott brown and 40% saying they would vote for ed marky, i'm declaring him for the winner to be. those numbers compared to the numbers you saw, hillary clinton way ahead of barack obama and that gap was closed. i think it is going to be closeable by ed marky. he has three million raised and ready to spend. >> yes, that gives him the opportunity to get his message out. and even though he has been in congress for 36 years, for 36 years, he has run from one little district in the entire state. this will be his first statewide race. that might explain why a third of the people polled haven't heard of him. he is big on climate change. and so, you know, let's see if your prediction comes true. jump in with me here on this one. you know, i wanted to jump in with you on the tim pawlenty thing. i knew i would be hearing about that tonight. >> i want to know who else is going to jump in. >> my point is scott brown is the current republican senator. he is polling below 50 and when he was running against elizabeth warren who started off n
blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your p
. >>> news from the state capitol where governor jerry brown reveals he has prostate cancer. his doctor says he has an excellent prognosis for recovery. leslie brinkley with more on the course of treatment. >> that's right. governor brown has already started treatment that is expected to wrap up the week of january 7th. and he intends to keep up a full work schedule. governor brown is undergoing radio therapy for prostate cancer with his office describing the condition as a localized prostate cancer. >> it sounds like he has early stage disease that is likely confined to the prostate. meaning it was picked up before it has had a chance to spread any place else. >> great swift works at the medical center and interpreted the statement released by brown's oncologist at ucsf as meaning the governor will undergo conventional exter national radiation therapy called image guided imrt. that likely means five days a week he will have to report to a radiation treatment facility. there are several in sacramento. he would then lie on the table and receive two to three minutes of radiation with minimal i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,832 (some duplicates have been removed)